What are Effects of Mixing Alcohol and Diazepam?

Those addicted to diazepam and alcohol suffer a double-dose of the depressant effects present in each drug. Alcohol works by slowing the responses of a patient’s central nervous system in a manner very similar to that of benzodiazepine like diazepam. These two drugs in combination can dramatically increase the overall effects of each and bring the risk of potentially deadly side effects.

How Common is this Form of Abuse?

“Those addicted to diazepam and alcohol suffer a double-dose of the depressant effects present in each drug.”-Projectknow.com Diazepam is available only with a prescription in the United States. The medication is a controlled substance under the Controlled Substances Act and not readily available unless a licensed health care provider or doctor anticipates a real need for the drug. Alcohol is regulated by state authorities and readily available to consumers over the age of 21 in the United States. Many users employ both of these drugs to treat the same symptoms, resulting in a high prevalence of combination effects in those prescribed diazepam for medical reasons.

Effects of Mixing Them Together

Diazepam dramatically increases the drowsiness and euphoric effects felt by alcohol, resulting in a high far greater than the sensations caused by alcohol alone. This increased high can become exceptionally addictive over time and inhibits the logical thinking ability of those under its effects, resulting in even further abuse of the two substances.

Are there any Adverse Effects?

The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration reports that alcohol is a contributing factor in one in 30 deaths worldwide. Two out of three American adults report having at least one drink in the past year, according to the same release. Common adverse effects experienced with this medication combination include:

  • Enhanced dizziness
  • Greatly impaired coordination and balance
  • Insomnia
  • Nausea to the point of vomiting

You should contact a doctor or visit an emergency room immediately if you notice a lapse in the breathing or consciousness of someone under the effects of alcohol and diazepam. Many of the adverse effects can be life-threatening when the drugs are taken in combination. Long-term damage to the liver is also a real threat with repeated use of both medications.

Getting Treatment and Ensuring Recovery

Those addicted to diazepam and alcohol often require professional assistance for detoxification and rehabilitation due to the psychological and physical dependencies created through abuse of these medications. Local substance abuse treatment centers can often provide the medical services necessary to help reduce the sufferer’s cravings and the symptoms of benziodiaprene withdrawal syndrome that may appear during this process. “…may also benefit recovering addicts by enabling them to learn of the trials and successes of those who have experienced the same situations in their lives.”-Projectknow.com Friends and family members may wish to take part in the rehabilitation and recovery process once detoxification is completed. This process typically involves regular outpatient visits and courses on understanding and overcoming addiction to sedatives. Group therapy and similar sessions may also benefit recovering addicts by enabling them to learn of the trials and successes of those who have experienced the same situations in their lives. These therapies may help to rehabilitate former sufferers and work to prevent future instances of relapse. Fill out our secure contact form or call 1-888-287-0471 Who Answers? for more information on treatment options available in your area.

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